Apricot and Gold Aurora

I’ve had a groundswell of Auroras this year, in all their glorious girly pinkishness. It was almost enough to make me consider frocking up myself (nope, still in jeans and a t-shirt!). My client brought along some fabric she had found and some ideas and we set to work. First there was the dyeing of the net to a lovely soft colour. While good quality net comes in about 30 different colours subtlety of shading is not one of the characteristics!

net

hand-dyed net

I dyed the net to be the same soft colour as the bodice and then because she is a Princess I simply had to scallop the edges of the net. The knickers had to match the net so I toyed with a few variations of pink and ivory poplin and voile until I came up with the best match. You can just see the pink liner peeking through. It gave the perfect blush to the ivory to match the net. The lines on the pants are my sewing guide for the 10 layers of net.

pants

Knickers with sewing guide

I made up the bodice to fitting stage and then worked out my placement of venise lace. There are about 3 different motifs in this design cut up and rearranged. Once I’d finalised the design I photographed it as a record and then decorated it with pink and apricot rhinestones.

placing bodice decos

applique placement

After the fitting I finished the bodice and sewed on the appliques. Here it is sitting against the pretty dyed net all steamed and ready for the next stage of skirt construction.

bodice decoration

lots of different pinks and apricots

Because we wanted a detailed baroque look, we decided on 8 small petals around the hipline instead of a solid plate. Each petal was lined with interfacing and the appliques were machined on with gold metallic thread. If you bling them up first you have little choice but to hand sew them on … ask me how I know! Sometimes I still get carried away and  forget and bling them first. Then I smack myself in the head or say bad words. The petals were then edged with gold trim and THEN blinged.

petals

petals

The inner edge of the petals were clipped to fit the hip-line and hand-sewn onto the piping of the basque. I find the piping really useful as an anchor point for the plate.  I don’t sew the plate (or petals) between the basque ans the top layer of net as I like to wiggle things into place when the skirt is finished.  This is because the  hip-line is more of an ellipse than a circle so clipping for the curve at the front and the back is much shallower than for the petals at the side. It also means that it’s easier to change the decoration on the tutu at a later stage. Petals are great because you can position them either side of the centre back and you don’t have to make a placket for the back opening.

sewing on petals

sewing on petals

After sewing on the petals I gathered some light gold lace and tucked it up underneath the petals and stitched it down. Then I stitched the petals down over the lace into the skirt and finally sewed down the lace to keep it in place.

petals 2

overskirt detail

And there you have Aurora, the second one for the year!

tutu

Aurora

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2 thoughts on “Apricot and Gold Aurora

  1. S L Hamilton says:

    I’m so in awe of all you beautiful designs, It takes shear talent to make a tutu even if you have all your training. Im making (attempting) to make one for my daughter and was wondering if you could share how you do the scalloped edges. I would be very grateful. And thank you I will continue to follow you.

    • Thanks so much for your lovely comments on my work!For scalloping or feathering you can use a template or do it by eye. For either method I cut through a number of layers at once, either pinning all the layers together with the edges all neatly aligned or folding net over until it is about 2.cm wide. The key really is lining up the edges of your net evenly. For the folded net I freehand cut a half circle across the top (2.5cm radius) or otherwise use a template (I made one using a 20c piece and traced it out for about 70cm) and a tailors pencil to trace it onto the net. Start on the lowest ruffles. It won’t matter so much if the ones underneath are a bit dodgy. By the time you get to the top you should ave got the knack of it. The top layer should be as close to perfect as you can get … but don’t stress. Remember the 5m rule … For stage costumes, if you can’t see a detail at 5m, it’s not there.

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